The University of California Institute for Research in the Arts supports embedded arts research through critical exchange

Spiraling Time: Intermedial Conversations in Latin American Arts

Dates: March 15 – 16, 2013

Location: Museum Theater, UC Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive
2621 Durant Avenue (access via the Sculpture Garden)

Free and open to the public

Pre-Symposium Event
Latin American Legacies: Films of Leandro Katz
Tuesday, March 12, 2013, 7pm
Pacific Film Archive, 2575 Bancroft Way
$5.50-9.50/person, advance tickets available

On March 15 and 16, 2013, the Arts Research Center at UC Berkeley presents Spiraling Time: Intermedial Conversations in Latin American Arts, a day-and-a-half symposium bringing together artists, scholars, and curators to investigate how various “time-based” art practices are pressed into service in a Latin American context to think through questions of history, memory, and temporality. The event will focus on interactive conversations between participants (and audience members), punctuated by three keynote addresses from the perspectives of art history and performance studies.

Time Zones is a yearlong series of events sponsored by the Arts Research Center exploring time-based and socially engaged art practices in an international context.

Spiraling Time is a day-and-a-half symposium bringing together artists, scholars, and curators to investigate how various “time-based” art practices are pressed into service in a Latin American context to think through questions of history, memory, and temporality. The event will focus on interactive conversations between participants (and audience members), punctuated by three keynote addresses from the perspectives of art history and performance studies.

The Pacific Film Archive presents Argentine artist Leandro Katz in person at a screening of a selection of his stunning films from two research projects centered on significant moments in Latin American history. Paradox contrasts shots of an ancient Mayan stone altar with images of manual labor at nearby banana plantations—thus reflecting on two paradoxical legacies of Latin America. The award-winning The Day You’ll Love Me is a complex and moving meditation on the photos taken of Che Guevara after his execution by the Bolivian army in 1967.

A complete symposium schedule is available at http://arts.berkeley.edu/events/spiralingtime.html.

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